Friday, January 19, 2007

 

100 Hours, 6 Tasks, 1 Commie

Well, the first communist speaker of the house (by the way, she's the first woman, too), Nancy Pelosi has fulfilled her promise of completing certain tasks within the first 100 hours of their session - sort of.

Much like the budgets in the old Democrat run congresses, the Congressional Dems do not measure hours like the rest of us in AmeriKa. You see, it took 336 real hours to complete the Democratic 100 hours.

"We have passed an agenda which we promised the American people we would pass in the first 100 hours. No matter how much fun they make of it, no matter how many different ways to count it, we made it within our first 100 hours," said House Majority Leader Rep. Steny Hoyer, D-Md. Even Hoyer admits that it is their 100 hours, not a normal 100 hours.

Just for kicks and grins, let's pretend you have a job - for most democratic constituents that may be a tough proposition, true - and your boss has given you eight hours to complete a certain task. Do you:
a) Start on the task immediately and do not quit until the task is completed.
immediately take a break for some special occasionsion (like the national championship game) then start on the eight hour task.
c) Take a break for some special occasionsion, work a few hours, go home for the day, come back tomorrow, work a couple of hours and go home, come back on the third day and complete the task. Taking a total of seven actual working hours to complete, you brag to your boss that you completed the task ahead of schedule.

For most Americans, "a" would be the honest and logical choice. For Congressional Democrats, the choice is either "b" (for rank and file Dems) or "c" for Dems in the leadership.

And what of the tasks that they so urgently needed to complete?

They "approved the remaining Sept. 11 commission recommendations that had not been made into law on Jan. 9; pushed through an increase of the minimum wage on Jan. 10, expanded federal funding for stem cell research on Jan. 11; allowed the government the power to re-negotiate Medicare drug prices on Jan. 12; and gave a cut in interest rates on students' college loans on Wednesday."

In order - they cost lives, they cost jobs, they cost more lives, they cost the elderly more money, and they cost the taxpayermore money. Expect the President to either veto or pocket-veto all or most of these items. The student loans and the minimum wage may get by the veto stamp. If he doesn't use the stamp on the stem-cell research funding increase, he will show that he is not a Reagan Republican (as he claims) but a weak-kneed moderate Republican as most conservatives have always suspected. He has yet to use the veto; if he doesn't use it here, he's finished.

Otherwise, Republicans in the House won't support much of anything he pushes from here until January 2009.

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